Uki via Murwillumbah

Uki is a small rural community 40Km west of Murwillumbah on the Murwillumbah/Kyogle Road.

Uki (pronounced yook-eye) located near the base of Mount Warning in the Tweed Valley on the far North coast of NSW right near the border between Queensland and New South Wales. According to the 2006 census, Uki had a population of 203 people.

There are several stories associated with the origins of the name Uki. One is that timber cutters, who were the first non-Aboriginal settlers in the area, marked the finest cedar for export to the United Kingdom with "UK1", this eventually becoming UKI, or Uki as it is known today. The other is that it may have derived from an aboriginal word for "small water plant (like a fern) with a yellow flower and edible root" - although the former is the most popular theory.

Clarrie Hall Dam is located 10 km from Uki. While the main function of the Dam is to provide fresh water for the Tweed Shire, recreational activities include sailing, rowing, canoeing, bass fishing, picnicking, bush hiking and bird watching.

 

The last two decades has seen a significant shift in demographics. 'Tree-changers' relocating from cities on the eastern seaboard are bringing new money, business, investment and entrepreneurship to the area enhancing the 'established' families with both remaining attracted by the subtropical climate, close proximity to pretty beaches and coastal villages and of course the world class natural beauty of the area.

Prominent buildings in the village include the historical 'Old Butter Factory' and several stores including a Post Office, General Store, Cafe, Bakery, Pharmacy, wheelchair-accessible Guesthouse and hairdressers. Uki is the

History

Early pioneers were either timber cutters (usually Australian Red Cedar) or dairy farmers. Photos of The Sisters and Mt Uki near Uki in the early 1900s show these cleared of nearly all vegetation.

Following a rationalisation of the dairy industry in the 1960s many dairies closed down with farmers turning to beef cattle, which remains a feature of the region today. Tropical fruits have also been grown in the area and cane farming is a prominent agricultural activity in the Tweed Valley itself. The last remaining sawmill is located on the Smith's Creek Road towards the north of the village.

 

tweed valley showing mt warning north nsw, australia uki retreat in the tweed valley northern nsw australia

The Tweed Valley

is an area of such vast natural beauty that you should be sure to plan to stay for more than just a few days in order to see as much as possible.

  • home to 5 world heritage listed national parks

  • the world's largest extinct shield volcano above water

  • highest level of bio-diversity in Australia

  • a range of activities from golf and horse riding to micro light flights, BMW Motor Bike Tours and more

  • arts and crafts with regular markets across the shire

  • art gallery home to the world's richest portrait prize

 

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Don't Forget the Tyalgum Classical Music Festival in September ~ click HERE